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Quotations - Bill of Rights

by Thomas Jefferson



BILL OF RIGHTS

I have a right to nothing which another has a right to take away... a bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general and particular; and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference.

(Letter to James Madison, Paris, December 20, 1787).

There are two amendments only which I am anxious for: 1. A bill of rights, which it is so much the interest of all to have that I conceive it must be yielded...2. The restoring of the principle of necessary rotation, particularly to the Senate and Presidency, but most of all to the last...

(Letter to Edward Carrington, Paris, May 27, 1788). THE POLITICAL WRITINGS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON 138 (Dumbauld Ed. 1955).

I will now add what I do not like. First, the omission of a bill of rights providing clearly and without the aid of sophisms for freedom of religion, freedom of the press, protection against standing armies, restriction against monopolies, the eternal and unremitting force of the habeas corpus laws, and trials by jury in all matters of fact triable by the laws of the land and not by the law of nations.

(Letter to James Madison, Paris, December 20, 1787). THE POLITICAL WRITINGS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON 140 (Dumbauld Ed. 1955).